Posted in Animal Communication

When you have to get it “right” in animal communication


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For over ten years I had a busy animal communication practice before switching my focus to teaching and writing. I met wonderful people and animals, but the biggest problem I had with being an animal communicator, was the pressure to be “right.”

When I teach budding animal communicators their biggest complaint is the same. But what if I am wrong? It feels like and is an enormous responsibility to provide answers to a grieving or troubled pet parent. Why is my animal sick? Why did he die? Why is he fighting with his sister? And we tune in and look for answers. The right answers the client needs.

Once in while I would have a client who would “test” me, but they were very rare. They wanted to see if I was truly “psychic.” But telepathic communication isn’t about being psychic. You are simply connecting one on one. You can’t give answers you aren’t hearing.

So, what do you do to relieve the pressure besides exploding after a reading or having a stiff drink? Here’s what I have learned that has helped me through the years.

  1. Let the animal provide the PROOF and the answers.

Sounds strange when I say let the animal have all the pressure, but it isn’t like that. Ask the animals open-ended questions. Instead of “What is your favorite food?” Show a bowl in your head and let the animal fill up the bowl. Ask the animal how they are feeling and what they think is wrong, vs. “What disease do you have?” Nothing shuts down the intuitive connection then very, very specific questions which narrows the answers you could receive. It’s the difference between letting it flow and forcing. Forcing never works. Ever try to shoot a ball into a basket? Notice the difference between relaxed focus and trying really, really hard.

2. Get in that relaxed space first.

Most students think they have to meditate for years to be a good communicator with animals. This always makes me laugh. I have one very active mind that doesn’t shut off. I am tuned in a great deal of the time, but I don’t meditate. The space between awake and falling asleep is THE perfect time to try to connect because you are just letting things flow in and out, and I almost always trust the answers that come then because my mind isn’t in the way.

3. You are going be wrong sometimes.

You might be tired, or you might be triggered by what issues the animal is having, or you might be forcing and your own stuff or thoughts will get it in the way. It’s not a perfect science, which is frustrating but true. And we are not perfect filters. If the animals could just talk out loud you would know for sure what they are communicating, but even then, like in conversations with people, things can be misconstrued. Thank goodness we don’t text with our animals.

4. Remind yourself you are not a veterinarian, of course, unless you are one. 

This is a biggie! I pride myself that I was very good at receiving information on an animal’s health, but I was never good at veterinary science. There’s so much I don’t know, like a backache could be from kidney issues. All an animal can describe is their symptoms and you might be able to see into the body, but you need to have a working knowledge of what you are seeing, and that’s not your job. I could describe that an animal has what feels like a ball in its ear, but I might not know that’s a cyst. Don’t try to be an expert, let the client know they need a doctor.

5. I want to see you screw up and get back up again.

I like when students just relax during practice and have fun. They can screw up and get the answer all wrong and still try again. As a teacher, I am more impressed by that. Practice is for having fun and test-driving animal communication. Less pressure = more surprises and more information coming through.

6. Sometimes a bed is just a bed.

Many times you get info and you jump to the conclusion that you are all wrong, when it was the interpretation of what you received that didn’t match, and that’s when it is best to simply describe what you are feeling, seeing and the thoughts you are getting. I would provide what I was seeing and the person could make those connections. If I was seeing a blue, natty looking blanket, I described that. That’s where I can be very specific. The dog’s person knows that blanket well and understands.That’s her dog’s favorite blanket! If I added my interpretation that I think that blanket means the animal wants a nap, I will risk being all wrong, and well, the dog will be super frustrated with me.

Take the pressure off and focus on being a better listener instead. Two different focuses, but one has less headaches and better communication.

If you want to study to be an animal communicator, and learn with fun, consider signing up for my mentorship offered this summer. Taking students for July and August now. All the info is over here

Can’t budget for a mentorship now? Buy the book

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Author:

I'm Ronni, a designing fairy living among the humans. I'm a writer and a designer/illustrator who loves to share what I've learned to help others in a fun way, whether it's my Help! I'm Sensitive series for the empaths, Healing Fairy Alphabet Deck for the part fairies, or the Idea Emporium for budding designers, I hope my creations help make life more fun and easier. My products are all about WISDOM, DELIGHT, EMPOWERMENT & ACCEPTANCE. I live in a treehouse with my elf, giant ooh-yellow dog, and three step-fairies.